The water level of over five kilometres of the 200-year-old waterway has been reduced as part of a wide-ranging programme of winter maintenance. In total, around 30,000 cubic metres of water have been drained from the canal.

Staff from APEM’s field team are using electro-fishing techniques to safely capture fish in the drained section of the canal and move them to other parts of the waterway.

Among the species caught and moved are perch, roach, trout, pike and stickleback.

 

  • Fish removal on Union Canal, Scotland
  • Fish rescue_Union Canal, Scotland
  • Fish rescue_Union Canal, Scotland
  • Fish rescue_Union Canal, Scotland
  • Fish rescue_Union Canal, Scotland
  • Fish rescue_Union Canal, Scotland

The project is allowing Scottish Canals’ engineers to undertake a detailed study of the canal embankments to inform future maintenance of the historic waterway.

Richard Millar, director of infrastructure at Scottish Canals, said: “The 200-year-old Union Canal is a much-loved asset that attracts more than ten million visits each year from everyone from boaters and cyclists to joggers and walkers.

“However, many of them visit the waterway without ever seeing all the hard work that goes on behind the scenes, and below the waterline, to look after the heritage, engineering and habitats of the scheduled monument to ensure they continue to thrive for future generations to enjoy.

“The work we’re undertaking at Linlithgow is a fantastic chance for the public to see the scale of work that goes into caring for the incredible infrastructure of the Union Canal.

“They can glimpse the craftsmanship of the waterway’s eighteenth century design below the waterline and take a tour of the canal’s history, engineering and habitats led by the people who know it best – our passionate and knowledgeable engineers, environmental scientists, and heritage experts.”

If you have any queries, please contact Peter Dennis, field team manager.
Alternatively you can email us here. Or call 0161 442 8938.